The Long and Winded Road v2

This year’s Christmas Collection theme is mildly subdued greys with OMGBRIGHTYELLOW

Posted in Musings, Technology, The Internet by enochlau on 21 November, 2008

Looks like Gmail has finally implemented design themes. I expected them to implement something like that eventually, but I was still surprised when I logged in today and found OMGTHECOLOURSMYEYESAREBLINDEDYAY. Most of them look good, though I wish I had a bit more control over the colours; I’m sure that we’ll get that option sooner or later (knowing Google, a button to take over the world will likely appear before you know it).

 

Ninjas attack my Gmail!

Ninjas attack my Gmail!

 

Most of the Internet (and many investors too) already sings Google’s praises while dancing around its giant shining statue, so I won’t add to the chorus. I’ll divert slightly to a small, minor, little, teeny-weeny, trivial peeve of mine.

I HATE THE INTERNET.

Okay, maybe I came on a little strong with that.

I STILL HATE THE INTERNET.

Ha, you say. I’m writing this on a blog on the Internet, bobbing around happily after Gmail — an Internet email service — announced bright colours and cutesy images as a feature (refer to Exhibit #1: Ninjas! above*) and still maintaining a mildly smelly and annoying presence on it, you say. Ah, hypocrisy – you have been well missed.

You got me, then. My peeve isn’t really with the Internet but rather with the way it’s encouraged people to simply plonk their opinions on the table whenever they see fit (… like this blog, for example. *nervous cough*). Those of you who have been on an Internet forum would be familiar with how no matter what topic, time, group or alignment, there will always, always, always be a jerk there. Or at least a few of them. Comment wars, flames and lots of verbal mud-slinging is bound to happen over sometimes awfully trivial topics. Same thing goes for Youtube, where I remember a simple thing as a video of Lincoln Brewster doing a solo during a worship session was enough to get people flaming each other over whether his skills were “used for God” or that he was showing off, and this and that.

Yes, everyone has their own opinions, but the Internet has given everyone a reason to hide behind their computer screens and anonymously shove/plant/slam/throw their point of view (which is apparently the only “right view”, mind you) into other people’s faces without so much as a thought about the other person.

So really, the point of all this is:

1) I still hate the Internet, and I’m being hypocritical about it.
2) Use bright shiny colours and cute Japanese cartoon figures in Gmail for super happy joy love world of peace.

 

* The only thing that could possibly surpass ninjas on Gmail is super-deformed zombies on Gmail. Bring out the cartoon brains.

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A little office technology humour

Posted in Life, Technology by enochlau on 12 November, 2008

Overheard from the cubicle opposite me:

“Hope is not a strategy; when it comes to hardware, prayer is also not a strategy.”

Makes good business sense, but then again… religion never made any business sense (and any religious stuff that did make business sense… never really was religion in the first place).

More interestingly, if you’ve ever had to install Windows on your PC before you have a small glimpse of what it’s like having to wrestle inanimate piece of hardware to get stuff installed and running. There’s this particular demo server that we have that we’d almost swear was possessed. You’d set it up perfectly fine, and the next day when you need it to boot up it won’t work. Try a couple of times and nothing changes, but walk away for lunch and *ding*, it works fine after that. It’s as if it has a mind of its own.

So really, if technology stuff in our lives could think and had wills of their own, would that be a good or bad thing? That question will remain unsolved until we develop the first sentient computer.

In the meantime, I’m just happy I don’t have to justify to my laptop why I spend awful amounts of time on Youtube.